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the price in europe, japan, or elsewhere. host: and emory, dallas, texas, good morning. -- and memory, dallas, texas, good morning. -- anna marie, dallas, texas, good morning. caller: what can we do as a community to prepare? what are some things that we can do to perhaps -- me and a group of others -- we could create a project for awareness? guest: a great project for awareness is awareness about the distribution grid at the local level. in my area, washington, d.c., the utility for a variety of reasons and did not trim trees for decades. people complained because they were cutting trees and not want them on their property, so for the last few years with storms we have had an enormous amount of free-fall, branches, and so on. putting pressure on the utilities, running public projects, schools, so on, identifying areas that are vulnerable where a tree trimming process, and again, i am an environmentalist, i am not saying to cut down trees indiscriminately, but i am saying that there is a trade- off and if you do not do the maintenance at the local community level, there will be severe
. he spoke to supporters in dallas that year. >> wait just a minute. the first thing we want to do, we will be talking about this in a minute. the first thing we want to do is to team up together and make it work now, right? absolutely. you are not too happy, we can make some changes in 1994, right? the main thing now, time is precious. let's try to make it work. texas working together to make it work. i will be talking about that in a minute. we have worked to starting right away. our country needs all of our help. [applause] i want to thank all of you are here tonight and all the people who have come here together across the nation. starting last february, you did something that everybody said could not be done. millions of you came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you f
response. guest: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but it has always been with us. going back to 1876, that was an interesting election. he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings b
house, he jumps out of airplanes, he goes back and forth to dallas every weekend. and the question, ralph, that all of us want to know is what kind of vitamins are you taking? because we all want to be on whatever diet that you're on. but what i wanted to say about ralph tonight is, you know, i don't -- ralph is a congressman to many people and the people in rockwall. but to all of us, ralph hall is our friend. and we're very proud of our friend and we're very proud to have the opportunity to serve with a great man like ralph hall. my ralph hall story is we were celebrating one of his birthdays on a thursday, the texas republican delegation has lunch every thursday and somebody brought a birthday cake in, they brought the cake in and i think we had a candle there and we just had one to kind of commemorate all of the years, the fire marshall wouldn't let us bring all the rest of them, sorry, ralph. but he was making light of his birthday and he looked at us and said, you know what the worst thing that somebody can say to you on your birthday? is don't you look natural? but what we k
was around dallas because of budget cuts. remember, this is a disease spread by mosquitoes. texas has no entomologist anymore. they cut the position because they ran out of money. >> for over a century, the u.s. fire service had the task of extinguishing any fire that was started on federal land. that wound up with a situation where we have these huge, hot, devastating forest fires in the modern era. is our public health policy doing something similar? >> is an interesting metaphor, but i do not know if it is completely transferable. >> what about the trend in decline of vaccination. another colleague wrote a book called the panic virus. he talked about the virus spread of belief that vaccinations make people sick, especially children. vaccinations cause autism, among other things. a lot of science shows that is a false concern, but it has led to a serious decline of rates of vaccination in children in some areas. >> let's not completely step away from the point that was just made. it is an interesting idea. there is another way of looking at that, and this is that there has been an i
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5